Cancer


Medical marijuana use for pediatric oncology patients: single institution experience

Ruth Ofir, Gil Bar-Sela, Myriam Weyl Ben-Arush & Sergey Postovsky (August 2019)

Medical marijuana (MM) is widespread in many medical fields, including oncology, with limited use in pediatric oncology where research is scarce and often shows conflicting results. This research focuses on alleviating side effects of anticancer treatment as an integral part of supportive and palliative care of children with cancer. We report our experience with MM treatment in 50 children, adolescents, and young adults with different types of cancer during 2010–2017. The main indications for prescriptions were nausea and vomiting, decreased mood, disturbed sleep, and pain. The medication was supplied to 30 patients via oil drops (60%) and 11 via smoking (22%), followed by vaporization, capsules, or combinations of various routes. Positive effects were reported by verbal children and parents in 80% of cases.

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If you proceed to article you will be leaving the CB1 Capital Management website to access a website hosted by a party unrelated to CB1 Capital Management. CB1 Capital Management assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of any of these studies nor does CB1 assume any obligation to update any of these studies based on subsequent research.


Opportunities for cannabis in supportive care in cancer

Amber Kleckner, Ian Kleckner, Charles Kamen, Mohamedtaki Tejani, Michelle Janelsins, Gary Morrow and Luke Peppon (August 2019)

There is a reasonable amount of evidence to consider cannabis for nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite, and pain as a supplement to first-line treatments. There is promising evidence to treat chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, gastrointestinal distress, and sleep disorders, but the literature is thus far too limited to recommend cannabis for these symptoms. Scant, yet more controversial, evidence exists in regard to cannabis for cancer- and treatment-related cognitive impairment, anxiety, depression, and fatigue. Adverse effects of cannabis are documented but tend to be mild. Cannabis has multifaceted potential bioactive benefits that appear to outweigh its risks in many situations. Further research is required to elucidate its mechanisms of action and efficacy and to optimize cannabis preparations and doses for specific populations affected by cancer.

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If you proceed to article you will be leaving the CB1 Capital Management website to access a website hosted by a party unrelated to CB1 Capital Management. CB1 Capital Management assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of any of these studies nor does CB1 assume any obligation to update any of these studies based on subsequent research.


Flavonoid Derivative of Cannabis Demonstrates Therapeutic Potential in Preclinical Models of Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

Michele Moreau, Udoka Ibeh, Kaylie Decosmo, Noella Bih, Sayeda Yasmin-Karim, Ngeh Toyang, Henry Lowe and Wilfred Ngwa (August 2019)

In this study, we investigate a new non-cannabinoid, non-psychoactive derivative of cannabis, called FBL-03G, to assess its potential for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. We hypothesize that the use of FBL-03G will have therapeutic potential and can enhance radiotherapy during the treatment of pancreatic cancer. To investigate this hypothesis, in vitro studies were first carried out with and without radiotherapy (RT). In vitro studies, in vivo studies were also conducted in small animals employing FBL-03G sustainably delivered from smart radiotherapy biomaterials, allowing continual exposure of the tumor to the cannabis derivative payloads over time.

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If you proceed to article you will be leaving the CB1 Capital Management website to access a website hosted by a party unrelated to CB1 Capital Management. CB1 Capital Management assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of any of these studies nor does CB1 assume any obligation to update any of these studies based on subsequent research.


Cannabidiol Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Cell Apoptosis in Human Gastric Cancer SGC-7901 Cells

Xin Zhang, Yao Qin, Zhaohai Pan, Minjing Li, Xiaona Liu, Xiaoyu Chen, Guiwu Qu, Ling Zhou, Maolei Xu, Qiusheng Zheng and Defang Li (July 2019)

The main chemical component of cannabis, cannabidiol (CBD), has been shown to have antitumor properties. The present study examined the in vitro effects of CBD on human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. We found that CBD significantly inhibited the proliferation and colony formation of SGC-7901 cells. Further investigation showed that CBD significantly upregulated ataxia telangiectasia-mutated gene (ATM) and p53 protein expression and downregulated p21 protein expression in SGC-7901 cells, which subsequently inhibited the levels of CDK2 and cyclin E, thereby resulting in cell cycle arrest at the G0–G1 phase. In addition, CBD significantly increased Bax expression levels, decreased Bcl-2 expression levels and mitochondrial membrane potential, and then upregulated the levels of cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved caspase-9, thereby inducing apoptosis in SGC-7901 cells. Finally, we found that intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased after CBD treatment. These results indicated that CBD could induce G0–G1 phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by increasing ROS production, leading to the inhibition of SGC-7901 cell proliferation, thereby suggesting that CBD may have therapeutic effects on gastric cancer.

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If you proceed to article you will be leaving the CB1 Capital Management website to access a website hosted by a party unrelated to CB1 Capital Management. CB1 Capital Management assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of any of these studies nor does CB1 assume any obligation to update any of these studies based on subsequent research.


Medical Cannabinoids for Cancer Cachexia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Jing Wang, Yanling Wang, Mengting Tong, Hongming Pan, and Da Li (June 2019)

Objectives. Cancer cachexia (CCA) is an intractable and ineffective metabolic syndrome that attacks 50–80% of cancer patients. It reduces patient’s life quality, affects the efficacy of treatment, and then increases their mortality; however, there are no established therapeutic strategies for CCA in the world. In this study, we assess the positive and negative effects of cannabinoid in the treatment of CCA. Methods. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, and PubMed up to December 2017. Conclusions. Our analysis showed cannabinoid is effective in increasing appetite in cancer patients. However, it declines the quality of life, which may be due to the side effects of cannabinoid.

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If you proceed to article you will be leaving the CB1 Capital Management website to access a website hosted by a party unrelated to CB1 Capital Management. CB1 Capital Management assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of any of these studies nor does CB1 assume any obligation to update any of these studies based on subsequent research.


Safety and Efficacy of Inhaled Cannabis (Synthetic THC/CBD) for Improving Quality of Life in Advanced Cancer Patients (Serenity)

Martin Chasen, MD (June 2019)

The overall HRQoL (Health related Quality of Life) of patients with uncontrolled symptoms related to advanced cancer will be measured using a patient self rating questionnaire. [ Time Frame: change from baseline in the EORTC-QLQ-C15-PAL overall QoL single-item scale score at Week 4 ] The QoL will be measured using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire - Core 15 Palliative (EORTC-QLQ-C15-PAL) item 15. Scale range is 1 to 7; 1 (very poor) being the worst rating to the maximal rating of 7 (Excellent). Uncontrolled cancer pain will be measured using a patient self rating questionnaire. [ Time Frame: change from baseline in the EORTC-QLQ-C15-PAL pain multi-item scale score at Week 4.] The uncontrolled cancer pain will be measured using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire - Core 15 Palliative (EORTC-QLQ-C15-PAL) item 5 and 12. Scale range is 1 to 4; 1 (not at all) being the worst rating to the maximal rating of 4 (Very Much).

Important Notice

If you proceed to article you will be leaving the CB1 Capital Management website to access a website hosted by a party unrelated to CB1 Capital Management. CB1 Capital Management assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of any of these studies nor does CB1 assume any obligation to update any of these studies based on subsequent research.


Evaluation of Colorado oncology providers on the use of medical marijuana.

Ashley Elizabeth Glode, Garth C. Wright, and Stephen Leong (June 2019)

Background: There is a lack of knowledge regarding medical marijuana use in cancer patients. More information is needed due to increase in both state approvals and access to medical marijuana. We hypothesized that variation in provider knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors exists across all professions in oncology, which contributes to a lack of both provider awareness of patient use and patient education on marijuana use. Conclusion: Regardless of profession, the majority of oncology providers in Colorado do not recommend and do not feel comfortable recommending or suggesting medical marijuana to a cancer patient, yet most believe it provides medical benefit. Providers believe there is a need for education and research on the use of medical marijuana in oncology patients.

Important Notice

If you proceed to article you will be leaving the CB1 Capital Management website to access a website hosted by a party unrelated to CB1 Capital Management. CB1 Capital Management assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of any of these studies nor does CB1 assume any obligation to update any of these studies based on subsequent research.


Medical cannabis in cancer patients: Prevalence, efficacy, and safety.

David Macari, Bolanle Gbadamosi, MD., Daniel Ezekwudo, John Khoury, Ishmael A. Jaiyesimi, and Susanna S. Gaikazian (June 2019)

Cancer patients are using medical cannabis (MC) to address symptoms, however, little data exists to guide clinicians when counseling patients regarding use. We seek to define the patterns of MC use among oncology patients as well as efficacy and safety of MC. Cancer patients attending oncology office visits at Beaumont Hospital, Michigan from July – Dec 2018 were anonymously surveyed. The survey included data regarding demographics, diagnosis, treatment, symptom burden, and MC use. Patients who reported MC since their cancer diagnosis completed a section on patterns of use, efficacy, and safety.

Important Notice

If you proceed to article you will be leaving the CB1 Capital Management website to access a website hosted by a party unrelated to CB1 Capital Management. CB1 Capital Management assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of any of these studies nor does CB1 assume any obligation to update any of these studies based on subsequent research.


Cannabinoids in Gynecological Diseases

Petra Luschnig and Rudolf Schicho (June 2019)

The ECS regulates almost all levels of female reproduction, starting with oocyte production through to parturition. Dysregulation of the ECS is associated with the development of gynecological disorders from fertility disorders to cancer. Cannabinoids that act at the ECS as specific agonists or antagonists may potentially influence dysregulation and, therefore, represent new therapeutic options for the therapy of gynecological disorders.

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If you proceed to article you will be leaving the CB1 Capital Management website to access a website hosted by a party unrelated to CB1 Capital Management. CB1 Capital Management assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of any of these studies nor does CB1 assume any obligation to update any of these studies based on subsequent research.


Efficacy, tolerability and safety of cannabis-based medicines for cancer pain

Winfried Häuser, Patrick Welsch, Petra Klose, Lukas Radbruch and Mary-Ann Fitzcharles (May 2019)

Very low quality evidence suggests that oromucosal nabiximols and THC have no effect on pain, sleep problems and opioid consumption in patients with cancer pain with insufficient pain relief from opioids. The complete manuscript is written in English.

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If you proceed to article you will be leaving the CB1 Capital Management website to access a website hosted by a party unrelated to CB1 Capital Management. CB1 Capital Management assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of any of these studies nor does CB1 assume any obligation to update any of these studies based on subsequent research.


The Effects of Cannabidiol and -Tetrahydrocannabinol Concentration on Breast Cancer Cell Viability

Dorothy Achiaa Agyemang (May 2019)

Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol(CBD) are phytocannabinoids that have a potential impact in cancer treatments.Studies have shown that certain cannabinoids cause cancer cells to die, but only with selective concentrations, which have not been well documented. The first study of this thesis was to determine the exact concentration of CBD and THC needed to kill human MCF-7 breast cancer cells, rather than creating mass multiplication leading to more growth of the cancer.

Important Notice

If you proceed to article you will be leaving the CB1 Capital Management website to access a website hosted by a party unrelated to CB1 Capital Management. CB1 Capital Management assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of any of these studies nor does CB1 assume any obligation to update any of these studies based on subsequent research.


Using Cannabis to Treat Cancer-Related Pain

Timothy Byars, Eloise Theisen and Deborah L. Bolton (May 2019)

Cannabis and cannabinoid medicines, as modulators of the endocannabinoid system, offer novel therapeutic options for the treatment of cancer-related pain, not only for patients who do not respond to conventional therapies, but also for patients who prefer to try cannabis as a first treatment option.

Important Notice

If you proceed to article you will be leaving the CB1 Capital Management website to access a website hosted by a party unrelated to CB1 Capital Management. CB1 Capital Management assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of any of these studies nor does CB1 assume any obligation to update any of these studies based on subsequent research.


Analysis of Potential Anti-Cancer Effects of Cannabinol and Cannabidiol using HCC1806 and HEK293 Cell Lines

Marina Galatonov, Dongping Li, Nuanying Zhong, Igor Kvalchuk (June 2018)

Humans produce endocannabinoids that act as neuromodulators in the endocannabinoid system. They bind to Gαi protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors to control the release of many neurotransmitters. Cannabinoids receptor 1 (CB1) mediates psychoactive effects through its location mostly in the central nervous system while Cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) regulates various immune responses through its location in peripheral tissues. The endocannabinoid system has been used as a molecular target by research to treat diseases such as multiple sclerosis, cardiovascular disorders, obesity and inflammatory pain. Thus, the endocannabinoid system is a potential molecular target to treat cancer. With the proposed legalization of recreational marijuana and with growing number of patients using cannabis for medicinal purpose, there is an urgent need to provide data on potential medicinal value of cannabis and cannabinoids.

Important Notice

If you proceed to article you will be leaving the CB1 Capital Management website to access a website hosted by a party unrelated to CB1 Capital Management. CB1 Capital Management assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of any of these studies nor does CB1 assume any obligation to update any of these studies based on subsequent research.


Cannabinoids and cancer pain: A new hope or a false dawn?

Matthew R.D. Brown and W. Paul Farquhar-Smith  (March 2018)

There are a wealth of preclinical data in a number of acute, chronic, neuropathic and cancer pain models that have demonstrated a potent analgesic potential for cannabinoids, especially in patients with cancer. However, although there are some positive results in pain of cancer patients, the clinical evidence for cannabinoids as analgesics has not been convincing and their use can only be weakly recommended. The efficacy of cannabinoids seems to have been ‘lost in translation’ which may in part be related to using extracts of herbal cannabis rather than targeted selective full agonists at the cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors.

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If you proceed to article you will be leaving the CB1 Capital Management website to access a website hosted by a party unrelated to CB1 Capital Management. CB1 Capital Management assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of any of these studies nor does CB1 assume any obligation to update any of these studies based on subsequent research.


Use of cannabinoids in cancer care: palliative care

S.K. Aggarwal, MD PhD  (July 2014) 

Integrating cim into oncologic palliative care promises to improve overall health-related quality of life, to provide further relief from distressing symptoms and spiritual suffering, and to bring hope to patients and families facing terminal illness.

Important Notice

If you proceed to article you will be leaving the CB1 Capital Management website to access a website hosted by a party unrelated to CB1 Capital Management. CB1 Capital Management assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of any of these studies nor does CB1 assume any obligation to update any of these studies based on subsequent research.


Cannabinoids as therapeutic agents in cancer: current status and future implications

Bandana Chakravarti, Janani Ravi, and Ramesh K. Ganju  (July 2014)

Though cannabinoids are clinically used for anti-palliative effects, recent studies open a promising possibility as anti-cancer agents. They have been shown to possess anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic effects in vitro as well as in vivo in different cancer models. Cannabinoids regulate key cell signaling pathways that are involved in cell survival, invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, etc. There is more focus on CB1 and CB2, the two cannabinoid receptors which are activated by most of the cannabinoids. In this review article, we will focus on a broad range of cannabinoids, their receptor dependent and receptor independent functional roles against various cancer types with respect to growth, metastasis, energy metabolism, immune environment, stemness and future perspectives in exploring new possible therapeutic opportunities.

Important Notice

If you proceed to article you will be leaving the CB1 Capital Management website to access a website hosted by a party unrelated to CB1 Capital Management. CB1 Capital Management assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of any of these studies nor does CB1 assume any obligation to update any of these studies based on subsequent research.


The endocannabinoid signaling system in cancer

SimonaPisanti, PaolaPicardi, AlbaD’Alessandro, ChiaraLaezza, MaurizioBifulco  (May 2013)

The endocannabinoid system, comprising lipid-derived endocannabinoids, their G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), and the enzymes for their metabolism, is emerging as a promising therapeutic target in cancer. This report highlights the main signaling pathways for the antitumor effects of the endocannabinoid system in cancer and its basic role in cancer pathogenesis, and discusses the alternative view of cannabinoid receptors as tumor promoters. We focus on new players in the antitumor action of the endocannabinoid system and on emerging crosstalk among cannabinoid receptors and other membrane or nuclear receptors involved in cancer. We also discuss the enzyme MAGL, a key player in endocannabinoid metabolism that was recently recognized as a marker of tumor lipogenic phenotype.

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If you proceed to article you will be leaving the CB1 Capital Management website to access a website hosted by a party unrelated to CB1 Capital Management. CB1 Capital Management assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of any of these studies nor does CB1 assume any obligation to update any of these studies based on subsequent research.


Increasing 2-arachidonoyl glycerol signaling in the periphery attenuates mechanical hyperalgesia in a model of bone cancer pain

Iryna A.Khasabova, AnishaChandiramani, CatherineHarding-Rose, Donald A.Simone, Virginia S.Seybold  (July 2011)

Metastatic and primary bone cancers are usually accompanied by severe pain that is difficult to manage. In light of the adverse side effects of opioids, manipulation of the endocannabinoid system may provide an effective alternative for the treatment of cancer pain. The present study determined that a local, peripheral increase in the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) reduced mechanical hyperalgesia evoked by the growth of a fibrosarcoma tumor in and around the calcaneous bone. Intraplantar (ipl) injection of 2-AG attenuated hyperalgesia (ED50 of 8.2 μg) by activation of peripheral CB2 but not CB1 receptors and had an efficacy comparable to that of morphine.

Important Notice

If you proceed to article you will be leaving the CB1 Capital Management website to access a website hosted by a party unrelated to CB1 Capital Management. CB1 Capital Management assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of any of these studies nor does CB1 assume any obligation to update any of these studies based on subsequent research.


Reduction of Bone Cancer Pain by Activation of Spinal Cannabinoid Receptor 1 and Its Expression in the Superficial Dorsal Horn of the Spinal Cord in a Murine Model of Bone Cancer Pain

Shingo Furuse, M.D.; Tomoyuki Kawamata, M.D., Ph.D.; Jun Yamamoto, M.D., Ph.D.; Yukitoshi Niiyama, M.D., Ph.D.; Keiichi Omote, M.D., Ph.D.; et al  (July 2009)

The results of our study demonstrate that spinal CB1 activation by an exogenously administered CB1 agonist reduced bone cancer–related pain behaviors, including behaviors related to spontaneous pain and movement-evoked pain. Presynaptic inhibition of spinal neurons and/or descending fibers may contribute to spinal CB1 activation–induced analgesia. In addition, MOR expression in the superficial dorsal horn ipsilateral to the site of implantation of sarcoma cells was decreased compared to that contralateral to the site of implantation, whereas CB1 expression in the superficial dorsal horn was preserved. The findings of this study may lead to novel strategies for the treatment of bone cancer pain.

Important Notice

If you proceed to article you will be leaving the CB1 Capital Management website to access a website hosted by a party unrelated to CB1 Capital Management. CB1 Capital Management assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of any of these studies nor does CB1 assume any obligation to update any of these studies based on subsequent research.


A Decrease in Anandamide Signaling Contributes to the Maintenance of Cutaneous Mechanical Hyperalgesia in a Model of Bone Cancer Pain

Iryna A. Khasabova, Sergey G. Khasabov, Catherine Harding-Rose, Lia G. Coicou, Bryan A. Seybold, Amy E. Lindberg, Christopher D. Steevens, Donald A. Simone and Virginia S. Seybold  (October 2008)

Tumors in bone are associated with pain in humans. Data generated in a murine model of bone cancer pain suggest that a disturbance of local endocannabinoid signaling contributes to the pain. When tumors formed after injection of osteolytic fibrosarcoma cells into the calcaneus bone of mice, cutaneous mechanical hyperalgesia was associated with a decrease in the level of anandamide (AEA) in plantar paw skin ipsilateral to tumors. The decrease in AEA occurred in conjunction with increased degradation of AEA by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). Intraplantar injection of AEA reduced the hyperalgesia, and intraplantar injection of URB597, an inhibitor of FAAH, increased the local level of AEA and also reduced hyperalgesia. An increase in FAAH mRNA and enzyme activity in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) L3–L5 ipsilateral to the affected paw suggests DRG neurons contribute to the increased FAAH activity in skin in tumor-bearing mice.

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If you proceed to article you will be leaving the CB1 Capital Management website to access a website hosted by a party unrelated to CB1 Capital Management. CB1 Capital Management assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of any of these studies nor does CB1 assume any obligation to update any of these studies based on subsequent research.


Cannabinoids in pancreatic cancer: Correlation with survival and pain

Christoph W. Michalski, Florian E. Oti, Mert Erkan, Danguole Sauliunaite, Frank Bergmann, Pal Pacher, Sandor Batkai, Michael W. Müller, Nathalia A. Giese, Helmut Friess, Jörg Kleeff  (October 2007)

There was a significant relationship between low CB1 receptor immunoreactivity or mRNA expression levels (p = 0.0011 and p = 0.026, respectively), or high FAAH and MGLL cancer cell immunoreactivity (p = 0.036 and p = 0.017, respectively) and longer survival of PDAC patients. These results are underlined by a significant correlation of high pain scores and increased survival (p = 0.0343). CB2 receptor immunoreactivity, CB2 receptor, FAAH and MGLL mRNA expression levels did not correlate with survival. Therefore, changes in the levels of endocannabinoid metabolizing enzymes and cannabinoid receptors on pancreatic cancer cells may affect prognosis and pain status of PDAC patients.

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If you proceed to article you will be leaving the CB1 Capital Management website to access a website hosted by a party unrelated to CB1 Capital Management. CB1 Capital Management assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of any of these studies nor does CB1 assume any obligation to update any of these studies based on subsequent research.